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New Dimensions in Testimony

Experience a virtual conversation with Holocaust survivor Pinchas Gutter

Visit the Neuberger to experience the only Canadian installation of the USC Shoah Foundation's New Dimensions in Testimony, featuring Holocaust survivor Pinchas Gutter. Engage in a virtual conversation and discover the future of interactive Holocaust survivor narratives. Available through May 2017.

Call 416-631-5689 or email neuberger@ujafed.org for more information about experiencing this innovative program in Toronto.

New Dimensions in Testimony is a collection of testimonies designed as an interactive educational tool to permit students far into the future to “talk” with Holocaust survivors about their life experiences.

Though this emergent technology is still developing, the beta version already enables students to interact with the projected image of a real Holocaust survivor, which responds to questions in real time. The survivor selected for the demo project, Pinchas Gutter, who resides in Toronto, is among the 54,000 survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust and genocide whose testimonies live in the Visual History Archive. But the NDT project is a different initiative. For this, Gutter was interviewed again, this time before 50 cameras arranged in a rig to capture a three-dimensional recording of him telling his story in a new way, by answering questions that people are most likely to ask.

The value of the project is to provide an intimate experience with eyewitnesses to history who are uniquely qualified to reflect on life.

New Dimensions in Testimony is a collaboration between USC Shoah Foundation and USC Institute for Creative Technologies (ICT), in partnership with concept developer Conscience Display. It will eventually be available at selected museums and learning institutions around the world. The Neuberger is proud to host a demo of NDT as a testing facility through May 2017. 

Years from now, New Dimensions in Testimony will be able to provide a valuable opportunity to engage with a survivor and ask them questions directly, encouraging them, each in their own way, to reflect on the deep and meaningful consequences of the Holocaust. Being able to ask a survivor questions will allow students to be active participants in their learning and develop important communication and critical-thinking skills. Being able to ask their own questions will teach students things about the Holocaust they never could learn from just reading a history book. By providing valuable points of view from someone who was there, students can better understand the human story behind the Holocaust and understand the impact it had on real people in a manner that is responsive and engaging, making history more relevant to their lives.

Learn More About NDT

Funding for New Dimensions in Testimony was provided in part by Pears Foundation and Louis F. Smith.